Constructing a line graph

Today we will be constructing our very own line graphs and presenting different data. We will then be able to interpret and compare the data presented to answer questions and create a series of factual statements.

This quiz includes images that don't have any alt text - please contact your teacher who should be able to help you with an audio description.

Quiz:

Intro quiz - Recap from previous lesson

Before we start this lesson, let’s see what you can remember from this topic. Here’s a quick quiz!

Question 1

Question 2

Question 3

Question 4

Question 5

Q1.Look carefully at the line graph below. How many medals did Team GB win in rowing AFTER 2004?

1/5

Q2.Opps! Someone has incorrectly filled in the table based on the data shown on the line graph. But exactly how many mistakes have been made?

2/5

Q3.When annotating line graphs to help identify the correct values from the axes, we use a series of lines. Look at the pairs of lines below. How many pairs of parallel lines are there?

3/5

Q4.When annotating line graphs to help identify the correct values from the axes, we often draw a series of lines. Look at the image below. What do we call two straight lines that intersect (cross over) at a right angle?

4/5

Q5.Look closely at the line graph below. What is the average number of medals that Team GB achieved between 2000 and 2016?

5/5

This quiz includes images that don't have any alt text - please contact your teacher who should be able to help you with an audio description.

Quiz:

Intro quiz - Recap from previous lesson

Before we start this lesson, let’s see what you can remember from this topic. Here’s a quick quiz!

Question 1

Question 2

Question 3

Question 4

Question 5

Q1.Look carefully at the line graph below. How many medals did Team GB win in rowing AFTER 2004?

1/5

Q2.Opps! Someone has incorrectly filled in the table based on the data shown on the line graph. But exactly how many mistakes have been made?

2/5

Q3.When annotating line graphs to help identify the correct values from the axes, we use a series of lines. Look at the pairs of lines below. How many pairs of parallel lines are there?

3/5

Q4.When annotating line graphs to help identify the correct values from the axes, we often draw a series of lines. Look at the image below. What do we call two straight lines that intersect (cross over) at a right angle?

4/5

Q5.Look closely at the line graph below. What is the average number of medals that Team GB achieved between 2000 and 2016?

5/5

Video

Click on the play button to start the video. If your teacher asks you to pause the video and look at the worksheet you should:

  • Click "Close Video"
  • Click "Next" to view the activity

Your video will re-appear on the next page, and will stay paused in the right place.

Worksheet

These slides will take you through some tasks for the lesson. If you need to re-play the video, click the ‘Resume Video’ icon. If you are asked to add answers to the slides, first download or print out the worksheet. Once you have finished all the tasks, click ‘Next’ below.

This quiz includes images that don't have any alt text - please contact your teacher who should be able to help you with an audio description.

Quiz:

Constructing a Line Graph Quiz

Well done, that was an action packed lesson on constructing line graphs but you didn't falter! There is just one thing left to do now and that is to show what you know by completing the questions in the quiz below. Please take your time when interpreting the line graphs as there is a lot of information contained within them. Good luck!

Question 1

Question 2

Question 3

Question 4

Question 5

Q1.Look closely at the line graph below. Which one of the statements is true?

1/5

Q2.Look carefully at the line graph below. Since Sally's Sweet Shop opened in 2016, how many months has the shop made a net profit of over £1600?

2/5

Q3.Look carefully at the graph below. Which of the following statements is false?

3/5

Q4.Look carefully at both the line graph and table below. The data point for which Olympic Games has been incorrectly plotted according to the information in table?

4/5

Q5.During the lesson, we looked at how data from a table might look if it was presented using a different chart. Below is the Pie Chart we discussed. Can you remember why it would be unsuitable to show the data from the medals table?

5/5

This quiz includes images that don't have any alt text - please contact your teacher who should be able to help you with an audio description.

Quiz:

Constructing a Line Graph Quiz

Well done, that was an action packed lesson on constructing line graphs but you didn't falter! There is just one thing left to do now and that is to show what you know by completing the questions in the quiz below. Please take your time when interpreting the line graphs as there is a lot of information contained within them. Good luck!

Question 1

Question 2

Question 3

Question 4

Question 5

Q1.Look closely at the line graph below. Which one of the statements is true?

1/5

Q2.Look carefully at the line graph below. Since Sally's Sweet Shop opened in 2016, how many months has the shop made a net profit of over £1600?

2/5

Q3.Look carefully at the graph below. Which of the following statements is false?

3/5

Q4.Look carefully at both the line graph and table below. The data point for which Olympic Games has been incorrectly plotted according to the information in table?

4/5

Q5.During the lesson, we looked at how data from a table might look if it was presented using a different chart. Below is the Pie Chart we discussed. Can you remember why it would be unsuitable to show the data from the medals table?

5/5

Lesson summary: Constructing a line graph

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